Jainworld
Jain World
Sub-Categories of Passions

Herbert Warren's Jainism

THE UNIVERSE
CONSIDERATION OF ASPECTS, OR WAYS OF KNOWING THINGS
MAN AS HE ACTUALLY IS
Karmas
  CAUSES of Karmas
  MAN AS HE MAY BECOME
  MEANS TO THE END
  STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT (GUNASTHANA)
  FIRST STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT
  SECOND STAGE of development
  THIRD STAGE of development
  FOURTH STAGE of development: part-1
  FOURTH STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT: Part-2
  FIFTH STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT
  SIXTH TO FOURTEENTH STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT
  THE SPIRITUAL TEACHER
  LOVE (DAYA)
  SOILINGS OF THE RIGHT ATTITUDE
  SCALE OF LIVING BEINGS
  MEANS WHEREBY THE RIGHT ATTITUDE MAY BE OBTAINED
  TIME
  THIRTY-FIVE RULES OF CONDUCT
  SYNTHESIS OR RECAPITULATION
  BIBLIOGRAPHY

FIFTH STAGE OF DEVELOPMENT


 

 

Distrusting or wishing the death of others, for the sake of the safety of our own property.

Giving gratuitous advice about matters that are no concern of ours.

Lending dangerous weapons gratuitously, like guns; or implements which in their use destroy life; fishing tackle, garden tools.

Sheer carelessness of thought, word, and action, such as drinking; excessive sensuous indulgence; things done, said, or thought through extreme anger, pride, deceitfulness, or greed; excessive sleep; and also talk about matters which do not concern us, such as wars between other countries; talk about a woman's bodily charms; about good dinners; and about kings.

By taking this eighth vow, we use a means of guarding ourselves against many evils, which we might otherwise incur to no purpose.

 

TRANSGRESSIONS

1.   Gestures that arouse the sex passion (Kandarpa).

2.   Antics (joke), tomfoolery (wisecrack) (Kautkucya).

3.   Obtaining and keeping things that are not necessary for our worldly welfare (Bhogopabhoga Atireka).

4.   Overtalkativeness (Maukharya).

5.   Leaving a loaded gun, or any dangerous instrument, about (Samyukta Adhikaranata).

 

NINTH VOW (Samayika)

This is the first of the disciplinary vows (siksavrata). It is a vow, by observing which one gets equanimity. It consists in thinking about the permanent self; or in reading true philosophy or scriptures; or in lamenting the wrong one has done and strengthening the resolution not to repeat the wrong in future. Also revering the Master by recounting his merits. The time taken should be forty-eight consecutive minutes, predetermined and the vow should be taken to practice it a definite number of times a year, 12 times, 52 times, once a day, or some definite time.

The general idea of this vow is to sit in a certain place and read or media meditate on holy subjects, and especially to regret misdoings and resolve not to repeat them.

 

PARTIAL TRANSGRESSIONS

Misdirection of mind, speech, or body, during the time of meditation. That is, the mind, the speech, or the body must not occupy itself with other subjects than the one in hand.

Practicing the vow in a wrong place, that is, where there are insects that you might kill, while sitting or standing.

Forgetting the rites, i.e., leaving off in, say, 40 minutes, when you have determined upon 48 minutes.
 

TENTH VOW (Desavakasika Vrata)

It is reducing to a minimum the space in which we will move. It is undertaking to limit oneself to the space of one house, or one room for a day, once a year at least. It is the sixth vow, but more severe, in one form, it is to restrict daily our movements, according to our needs. One should not do anything which is beyond the limit specified.


PARTIAL TRANSGRESSIONS

Ordering things beyond the limit. Sending someone on some business beyond the limit. Making some sound to attract the attention of some one beyond the limit.

Making some sign to some one, beyond the limit, to come to you. Throwing something to a person beyond the limit, in order to attract his attention.


ELEVENTH VOW (Pausadhopavasa Vrata)

The eleventh vow is the same as the ninth, but continued for twelve or twenty-four hours, and accompanied by some fasting. By fasting we remove impurities. If the vow is taken, it must be practiced at least once a year. If food is taken at all on the day of fasting, it should not be between sunset and the following sunrise. It is usual to keep to one place, do no business, and drink nothing or eat nothing for twelve, twenty-four, forty-eight or seventy-two consecutive hours, once a week, once a month, or at least once a year.


PARTIAL TRANSGRESSIONS

The first of these refers more to India or any hot country it is not being particular to avoid:

1.   killing insects by one's clothes or one's bedding; and

2.   Not taking something to clear away whatever insects there may be.

3.   Not being particular to avoid killing anything, in performing the offices of nature.

4.   Despising the ceremony itself.

5.   Forgetting any of the necessary things to be done in this vow.


TWELFTH VOW (Atithisamvibhaga Vrata)

"Atithisamvibhaga" vow. Atithi means a guest, and samvibhaga means to distribute, share with. the vow is an undertaking to invite some Jain monk (or, in the absence of a monk, some respectable Jain layman, or, in the absence of both, to do so in thought), on the day following the fast undertaken in the previous vow, or whenever opportunity offers, to partake of some of the food about to be eaten, without informing the guest of the vow to do this; and only the things which are partaken of by the monk should be eaten at the time. It is things which are necessary for life that are partaken of; and books; clothing, medicines, etc., as well as food, may be offered to the person invited.

This vow, if taken, must be practiced at least once a year.


PARTIAL TRANSGRESSIONS

Offering food with life in it to a monk; fruit for instance, not cut. After fifty minutes of being cut, fruit becomes lifeless.

Putting living things among food which is free from life: for instance, putting fresh cold water, which has life, for instance, putting fresh cold water, which has life, with water that has been boiled. In the Jain belief, fresh cold water is a mass of living substance, and not merely the home of minute life or animalcule.'

Giving the food, etc., in a grudging spirit, saying that something which the monk may have asked us for and which we do not wish to give, belongs to a friend.

Inviting the monk at a time which we know to be after he has taken his meal.

That is the end of twelve special rules for helping to change ourselves from what we actually are-ignorant, mistaken, weak, injurious beings-to what we potentially are, according to the teachings of those Masters who have developed their spiritual qualities to perfection and have attained omniscience in the flesh. The rules are based upon a certain foundation of character already developed-kindness of heart, self-control, desire for right knowledge, and relish for truth, the internal attitude accompanying the external visible practice of the rules. These rules bring out further knowledge, increased strength of character, greater peace of mind, sympathy, and kindness, and lead to higher levels on the way towards an everlasting, blissful, omniscience in a state of life which is natural to the real pure self, and which is open to all who wish to attain it.