Jainworld
Jain World
Sub Categories of Jain Books
Books on Line
Pravachansara
 

Editor's Note

 

INTRODUCTION

 

UMASVATI VACAKA�S PRASAMARATIPRAKARANA-A STUDY

  LIFE: FAMILY, CASTE, DATE, SECT AND WORKS
 

PRASAMARATIPRAKARANA IS A WORK OF UMASVATI

 

SUMMARY OF PRASAMARATI 

 

COMMENTARIES ON PRASAMARATI PRAKARANA

  ETHICAL ASPECT OF PRASAMARATI PRAKARANA:
   

ACARA OF THE SADHUS (MONKS)              

   

ACARA OF THE HOUSEHOLDERS   

  PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECT OF PRASAMARATI PRAKARANA:    
   

Tattvas

   

SUBSTANCE         

   

 SYADVADA-THEORY OF NON-ABSOLUTISM 

   

CLASSIFICATION OF KNOWLEDGE

   

COSMOLOGY 

   

THE DOCTRINE OF KARMA

 

COMPARISON BETWEEN TATTVARTHADHIGAMASUTRA AND PRASAMARATIPRAKRANA.

 

COMPARISON OF PRASAMARATIPRAKARANA WITH JAINA AGAMAS101 AND SOME NON-JAINA WORKS

 

CRITICAL REMARKS ON PRASAMARATIPRAKRANA

 

Prashmartiprakranam l  

 

Ath Shastrasya Pithbandhah: ll1ll    

 

1.  Introduction              

    Ath ksaydhikar: ll2ll      
 

2.  On Passions   

    Ath ragadhyadhikar: ll3ll     
 

3.  On Attachment                

    Ath Karmadhikar: ll4ll  
 

4.  On Karma     

    Ath karnarthadhikardvayam: ll5-6ll    
 

5-6.  On Cause of Birth and Death  

    Ath Madsthanadhikar: ll7ll    
 

7.  On Pride             

    Ath Aacharadhikar: ll8ll  
 

Ath Bhavanadhikar: ll9ll   

 

On Reflection                

    Ath Dharmadhikar: ll10ll     
 

On religious Virtues             

    Ath kathadhikar: ll11ll 
 

On Religious Stories            

    Ath Jivadhikar: ll12ll 
 

On Soul  

   

Ath Upyogadhikar: ll13ll  

 

On Consciousness          

   

Ath Bhavadhikar: ll14ll

 

On States of Soul   

   

Ath Sadvidhdrvyadhikar: ll15ll  

 

On Six Substances         

   

Ath Charanadhikar: ll16ll

 

On Code of Conduct 

   

Ath Shiladgadhikar: ll17ll 

 

Ath Dhyanddhikar: ll18ll 

 

On Meditation                

   

Ath Shrenyadhikar: ll19ll  

 

On Sreni 

   

Ath Samuddhatadhikar: ll20ll

 

On Code of Conduct 

   

Ath Shiladgadhikar: ll17ll 

 

On Samudghata              

   

Ath Yognirodhadhikar: ll21ll 

 

On Yognirodha        

   

Ath Shivgamanvidhanphaladhikar: ll22ll

 

Description of the path of Liberation and Fruits 

 

Appendix

  Jain Books
  Catalog of Books in English
  Catalog of Books in Hindi
  Catalog of Books in Gujarati
  List of Books, Topics & Sub-topics and Authors


Ath ShreeDumaswativirchitam. 

(ENGLISH CONVERSION OF ORIGINAL LANGUAGE WORDS )

 Prashmartiprakranam l

 

Ath Madsthanadhikar: ll7ll 

(Original language words are missing) 

7.  On Pride 

Which wise man, who has comprehension of the lower, higher and intermediate (state of) innumerable (Lit. lakhs and crores) births in the revolving mundane world will have pride of caste? 81. 

(Original language words are missing) 

On account of Karma, all beings obtain various kinds of births having (different) sense organs.  In this (state of affairs) which being would have a permanent caste and (that too) which? 82.

 (Original language words are missing) 

Looking at the fact that people born even in high families are devoid of beauty, strength, intellect, right conduct, wealth, the pride of family should indeed be abandoned.  83. 

(Original language words are missing) 

What is the use of family pride for a man whose conduct is impure? Similarly, what is the use of family pride for a man who is adorned with his own virtues and good conduct? 84. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Where is the scope of pride of form (=physical charm), which is the product of semen and blood, which  perpetually grows and decays and again which is the abode of disease and old age? 85. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Where is the reason to be proud of form which is to be cleansed daily, which is covered by skin and flesh, (and) full of turbidity and which is decidedly perishable? 86. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Even a mighty person becomes very weak within a short period (due to diseases) and even weakened also becomes powerful on account of Samskaras (i.e., destruction of power hindering Karma).  87. 

(Original language words are missing) 

With the help of intellectual capacity, therefore, perfectly realizing the unsteady nature of physical, strength, comprehending one�s weakness in face of the power of death, even (a powerful man) should not feel proud though endowed with strength.  88. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Ascertaining gain and loss to be temporal being, a result of rise and annihilation (of benefit hindering Karma) respectively, one should not feel disgusted at loss and experience pride on account of gain.12 89. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Great monks never become proud even with abundant gain, that is something which is obtained due to other�s favourable nature and which is enjoyable for short period.  90. 

(Original language words are missing) 

How can ordinary man of modern time feel proud of their own intellect, knowing the fact that extra-ordinary men of old have the depth of infinite ocean (or vastness) of knowledge about limbs (of knowledge), method and alternatives, which are augmented with infinite modifications and (who were extra-ordinary) in the matter of comprehension, teaching, writing new treatise, contemplating on the fundamental principles and quickly grasping the teachings (of preceptors).  91-92. 

(Original language words are missing) 

What is the use of pride of popularity which is obtained, like a beggar through flattery of others, for the sake of self interest.? 93. 

(Original language words are missing) 

He, who takes pride in (cheep) popularity which is based on favourable nature of others, will be seized by multitude of grief, once that popularity disappears.  94. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Listening to the story of Masatusa13, various kinds of meanings (of some sutra) of Agamas and Sthulabhadramuni�s14 amazing body transformation (into lion); (and) having obtained knowledge of Agamas, the annihilator of all kinds of prides, which is easily obtainable by association (with the wise) and efforts, and which causes the accomplishment of the fundamental and sub-qualities; how can one feel proud of that very knowledge (of Agamas).  95-96. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Ultimately, there is not the slightest virtue in all these sources of pride.  And (If any), that is only one�s own mental agitation and augmentation of mundane life.  97. 

(Original language words are missing) 

He, who Is mad with prides of high family etc. becomes distressed in this life like a Pisaca15 and definitely attains birth in lower caste in the life hereafter.  98. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Thus, the monk who is desires to destroy the root of all kinds of prides, should give up entirely pride of one�s own virtues and reproach of others.  99. 

(Original language words are missing) 

In every birth, by the contempt and slander of others and selfpraise, one is destined to be bound by inferior heredity determining Karma which is difficult to be free from innumerable crcres of births.  100. 

(Original language words are missing) 

The lower, the higher and the middle (state of) human life results from rise of (heridity determining) Karma.  Similarly (the state of) the life of lower beings is distributed on account of difference in one or the other origin.  101. 

(Original language words are missing) 

How does attachment to worldly existence take place in the minds of wise people, when they observe an unevenness of place, family, body, learning, life-span, strength, enjoyment and riches in this world.  102. 

(Original language words are missing) 

He, who totally disregards virtue and vice and is fettered by rise of attachment and aversion, weakened by power of five senses, becomes tormentor of both himself and others.  103. 

(Original language words are missing) 

In order to attain the auspicious resultant state, therefore, one must strive with effort afforsaking attachment and aversion and conquering the five senses.  104. 

(Original language words are missing) 

(The Jiva) therefore, which is engrossed in worldly enjoyments (should constantly think as to how it can get itself detached from covetedness of undesirable sense objects.  Even with this deep bewilderment of the mind Jiva should definitely (get engrossed in) studying the Agamas.  105. 

(Original language words are missing) 

The (enjoyments of) sense-objects appear like festivals in the beginning, inflame the sentiments of erotic and humour in the middle (at the time of enjoyment) and become full of disgust, pathos, bashfulness and fright at the end.  106. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Even though, these objects during the course of enjoyment yield at most mental satisfaction, they become very dangerous like eating the kimpakaphala (which is very sweet but kills the enjoyer at the end).  107. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Just as sweet meal mixed with poison, though (prepared) with eighteen kinds of vegetables, various sweets and drinks, kills the enjoyer at the end; (and) similarly, sense-objects enjoyed with excessive attachment which is beautified by heap of flattery and meekness are causes of experience of affliction even in hundreds of series of births.  108-109. 

(Original language words are missing) 

Those who are attached to enjoyment of sense-objects even in the face of fixed (in the case of divine and hellish beings) and unfixed (in the case of human and lower beings) death at every step, shall not be considered human beings.  110. 

(Original language words are missing) 

One should always reflect upon (how) abstinence is possible from consequences of enjoyment of sense-objects, which pleases one�s mind.  He should also constantly reflect upon infinite and blemishless virtue (i.e., Great vow.) 111. 

Here ends Chapter on Pride