Jainworld
Jain World
Sub-Categories of Passions
Preface
Publisher's Note
Author’s Note
Mahavira: A Non-Violent Revolutionary
Transfer of Embryo
  Socio-political Conditions
  Vajji's Democracy
  Magadha and Srenika
  Ajatasatru Vajjis
  Princely following of Mahavira
  Social Conditions
  Intellectual Fervour
  Revolutionary push by Mahavira
  Significant Events
  Indra's Offer of Protection
  Five Resolves at Morak Hermitage
  Education Rather than Exposure
  Poisonous Fangs of Canda Kausika
  States of a Digambara
  Association with Gosala
  Candanabala : First Head of Women Disciples
  Final Act of Nirjara
  Attainment of Kaivalya
  First Ganadharas
  Muttanam-Moyaganam
  THE ULTIMATE REALITY
  ONTOLOGY OF ATMAN, THE SELF
  FACT OF THE MATTER
  JOURNEY TO FREEDOM
  ETHICS OF RESPONSIBILITY
  Actions follow the Doer
  Search for Responsibilty and Sramana Line
  Mahavira's Synthesis
  Psychological Approach of Mahavira
  Categories of Karmas
  Duration of Karmic Bondage
  Nature of Bondage
  Mitigation of Bondage
  Fresh Karmas
  Life's activities
  Even good actions bind, if motivated
  Consequences of Karma Theory
  MECHANICS OF CHANGE
  Process of Change and Nine Tattvas
  Essential Tendency of Jiva
  Papa' and ‘Punya' : Both of Binding Nature
  Asrava (Influx)
  Bandha (Bondage)
  Samvara
  Nirjara (Shedding of Accumulated Karmas)
  Moksa (Final Liberation)
  PLURALISTIC REALISM
  THEORY RELATIVITY
  MODUS OPERANDI
  Enlightened Consciousness
  Self, the starting point
  Will and Eagerness
  Upadana-Nimittan
  Bhavana or Anupreksa (Reflection)
  Twelve Vratas of House-holder
  Prayer
  Dhyana (Meditation)
  Lesya (Disposition)
  Code of Conduct for Monks - Modus Operandi
  Austerities (Tapascarya)
  Sanllekhana
  A PATH-WAY OF LIFE
  APPENDICES
  Appendix - A
  Appendix - B
  Appendix - C
  Appendix - D
  Appendix - E
  BIBLIOGRAPHY

MAHAVIRA : A NON-VIOLENT REVOLUTIONARY

Justice T.U.Mehta

Transfer of Embryo

This great soul of Mahavira was born in sixth century B. C. Some scholars accept 526 B. C. as the year of his birth while to some it was 599 B. C. Born in Kasyapa Gotra of Jnatr clan of Ksatriyas, he was also known as �Nataputta'. His father was Siddhartha and mother was Trisala, the sister of Vaisala king Cetaka. His parents were the followers of 23rd Tirthankara Parsva. �Svetambaras' (one of the dominant Jaina sects) believed that Mahavira was first conceived in the womb of one Devananada, a Brahmin lady. The embryo was later transferred to the womb of �Trisala' as the gods thought that Tirthankaras were not born in Brahmin families. �Digambaras' (another dominant Jaina sect) do not subscribe to this story of transfer to embryo. The story as to what the �gods' thought about the eligibility of a Brahmin family to give birth to a Tirthankara is undoubtedly jingoistic and not warranted by the basic principles of Jainism, and mission of equality which the lord himself carried during his life time. But the possibility of the transfer of foetus by some surgical operation cannot be ruled out. It may be noted in this connection that Bhagavati-sutra, the 5th anga of Jaina scripture containing a vivid picture of the life and work of Mahavira contains a story that after Mahavira became famous as an impressive preacher and masses were flocking to have his �Darshan�, a Brahmin couple named Devananda and Rsabhadatta came to see him. On seeing Mahavira, Devananda was overwhelmed by motherly emotions for him and milk began to flow from her breasts. When Gautama, the chief disciple, saw this and asked the master the reason for this state of Devananda, the master replied that this was because Devananda was his real mother. However, �Bhagavati-sutra' does not contain the story about the change of embryo. It is therefore reasonable to infer that Mahavira might have been adopted by the Ksatriya family of Siddhartha and Tri-sala, This controversy about the birth is not of any importance. What is of real importance, is the life and work of this great soul.